Secret Service re: Mitt Romney and President Obama

On November 08, 2012 at 7:19 AM

How the Secret Service Said Goodbye to Mitt Romney

By Marc Ambinder
At some point, early Wednesday morning, when Gov. Mitt Romney and family were tucked into bed, a quiet call went out on the radio channel used by his Secret Service agents: “Javelin, Jockey details, all posts, discontinue.”

Of all the indignities involved in losing a presidential race, none is more stark than the sudden emptiness of your entourage. The Secret Service detail guarding Governor Romney since Feb 1. stood down quickly. He had ridden in a 15-car motorcade to the Intercontinental Hotel in Boston for his concession speech. He rode in a single-car motorcade back across the Charles River to Belmont. His son, Tagg, did the driving.

There is no formal guideline for the Secret Service agents in this situation; it’s up to the discretion of the detail leader, who usually consults with the local police to make sure that his protectee’s home won’t be overrun by protestors and supporters all of a sudden.

But the Service leaves quickly. No more motorcades. No more rope lines. No more bubbles. Familiar faces disappear, never to be seen again.

In 2008, agents offered to see John McCain back to his ranch in Sedona, but McCain insisted on saying his good byes in his suite at the Biltmore Hotel. The next morning, McCain was seen driving his own car to get groceries.

Had Romney won, everything would have been different. A full counter-assault team, “Hawkeye Javelin,” was on stand-by in Boston, ready to supplement his detail. A team from the White House Communications Agency, which had been consulting with his informal transition team on secure space for intelligence briefings, was on hand too.

Romney has his family. When the race was close, agents would joke about the number of “j” words they’d need to come up with in order to give every one of his children, their wives, and all of their children code names. That’s 29 people who would have received, if not protection, at least a protective survey and recommendations from the Service. Quietly, plans had already been put in place to assign protective details to all of them, just in case.

The Secret Service has had a hellish year. Not only has it been the busiest ever for the small agency, but it has been their most embarrassing since the assassination attempt on Ronald Reagan in 1981. April’s prostitution in scandal in Cartegana, Colombia threatened to demoralize the entity in charge of safeguarding the democratic process right on the eve of their active phase; two conventions, major foreign trips for the president, the presidential debates, the United Nations General Assembly, the campaign season itself (with sometimes more than a thousand agents and officers changing locations daily). An Inspector General’s report has concluded that agents did not jeopardize the president’s safety, but having spent time with agents over these past few months, their morale has been flagging. The public mockery takes it toll, even on silent soldiers.

And yet, for everything they were confronted with, the Service did its job. Protectees were protected 100 percent of the time. Several assassination plots were nipped in the bud. Thousands of events were secured, perfectly. Results matter, as we learned Tuesday night.

Though no one in the Service was rooting one way or the other for any particular candidate, at least not to colleagues or publicly, not having to secure the Romney family means that agents who have been working 12 hours shifts for eight weeks straight can take some time off before the inauguration. Families of many more agents will get them home for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Secret Service said to have foiled several assassination attempts on President Obama and Mitt Romney during the campaign, but report is under scrutiny

GQ author Marc Ambinder defended his reporting with a list of public-record assassination attempts but had few other details to offer. A Secret Service spokesperson said he was unfamiliar with Ambinder’s sources.

 

By Charlie Wells / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

President Obama and Mitt Romney may have had something much more serious to lose on this year’s campaign trail than the presidency: life itself.

A number of assassination plots were thwarted by Secret Service agents over the course of this campaign, according to one reporter, whose findings have come under scrutiny from the media in the wake of Tuesday’s election.

In an article about Romney’s intensive security detail written by GQ’s Marc Ambinder, the journalist said that in the Secret Service’s busiest year yet, “Several assassination plots were nipped in the bud.”

This claim was almost immediately questioned by members of the media, especially as Ambinder took to Twitter to suggest that more information might come out in a print edition of the article.
Politicker reached out to Secret Service spokesman Edwin Donovan for further details on the reported plots.

“We didn’t work with Marc Ambinder on that article, so I don’t know what his sourcing is,” Donovan told the publication.

When Politicker contacted the author, he eventually responded but without many juicy details.

“There was that guy who shot at the White House from across the ellipse, and then the soldiers arrested for plotting the assassination of the president and others,” Ambinder wrote, ticking off a list of public-record assassination attempts.

“I don’t know any details about any non-public attempts, if there were any,” he wrote.

BEFORE: FIRST PHOTOS OF ESCORT AT CENTER OF SECRET SERVICE SCANDAL

Whether someone attempted to kill him as a presidential hopeful or not, Romney — apparently known as “Javelin” by the Secret Service — will return to post-candidate life without the massive security detail that followed his every move on the trail.

Obama, whose detail will, of course, continue, is known by the Service as “Renegade.”

 

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About vincepalamara

Vincent Palamara was born in Pittsburgh and graduated from Duquesne University with a degree in Sociology. Although not even born when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, Vince brings fresh eyes to an old case. In fact, Vince would go on to study the largely overlooked actions - and inactions - of the United States Secret Service in unprecedented detail, as well as achieving a world's record in the process, having interviewed and corresponded with over 80 former agents (the House Select Committee on Assassinations had the old record of 46 with a 6 million dollar budget and supboena power from Congress), not to mention many surviving family members, White House aides, and even quite a few Parkland and Bethesda medical witnesses for a corresponding project. The result was Survivor's Guilt: The Secret Service & The Failure To Protect President Kennedy. Vince is also the author of the books JFK: From Parkland To Bethesda and The Not-So-Secret Service. All told, Vince has been favorably mentioned in over 120 JFK and Secret Service related books to date (including two whole chapters in Murder in Dealey Plaza, The Secret Service: The Hidden History Of An Enigmatic Agency by Philip Melanson, and the Final Report of the Assassination Records Review Board, among many others), often at length, in the bibliographies, and in the Secret Service - and even medical evidence - areas of these works. Vince has appeared on the History Channel, C-SPAN, A COUP IN CAMELOT, KING KILL '63, THE MAN BEHIND THE SUIT, National Geographic, PCN, BPTV, local cable access television, YouTube, radio, newspapers, print journals, at national conferences, and all over the internet. Also, Vince's original research materials, or copies of said materials, are stored in the National Archives (by request under Deed Of Gift by the ARRB), the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, Harvard University, the Assassination Archives and Research Center, and the Dallas Public Library. Vince Palamara has become known (as he was dubbed by the History Channel in 2003) "the Secret Service expert." As former JFK Secret Service agent Joe Paolella proclaimed: "You seem to know a lot about the Secret Service, maybe even more than I do!" Agent Dan Emmett calls Vince a Secret Service expert in his new book.
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